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The June 2021 EIC Accelerator Results and the STABL Energy GmbH Success Story

The EIC Accelerator blended financing (formerly SME Instrument Phase 2, grant and equity) has finally completed its first iteration in 2021 despite the delayed launch of Horizon Europe (2021-2027) and only two deadlines in this first year. With the application process having changed dramatically after Horizon 2020 (2014-2020) ended, many professional writers and consultants had to adapt their approach to grant preparations (read: Re-Inventing the EIC Accelerator). With a longer proposal document, new templates, pitch videos, read-only pitch decks and more supporting information being requested, it was an interesting experiment for both the applicants and the European Innovation Council (EIC).

Many Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) and startups have applied to the EIC’s grant and, as has always been the case, only a fraction has been successful. The following article describes one of these success cases as well as the overall statistics of the June 2021 EIC Accelerator call.

The June 2021 EIC Accelerator Call

With the application process having changed dramatically, it comes as no surprise that there were many differences compared to the 2020 cut-offs. One of these differences is that the final statistics for the June deadline are not as clear as they were in 2020 since the new 3-Step process has an obscured number of total applicants.

This is due to the fact that there is no Step 1 deadline and it is unknown how many of the approved Step 1 projects actually applied to Step 2 in June since a significant number might have delayed the application to October 2021. The information communicated by the EIC is also limited with makes a detailed look at the overall statistics difficult.

Nonetheless, with the information that is available today (Linkedin: Nicolas Sabatier and EIC Support), one can conclude that:

Step 1

On May 17th, 67% or 755 out of 1,114 applicants had passed the threshold and received a GO for Step 1. With the Step 2 deadline having been on June 16th, this number continued to increase since at least 1,523 total Step 1 applications had been submitted at this point in time (but not all were evaluated yet). It is unlikely that all Step 1 successes decided to apply to the June deadline since, due to the limited time, many might have postponed the application to October 2021. If the success rate of selected applications has remained the same and 801 applicants eventually applied to Step 2 then an approximate 1,196 applicants have applied to Step 1 with the intention to apply to Step 2 in June 2021, yielding 801 approved projects and a 67% success rate for Step 1.

Note: To calculate a success rate for June 2021, one has to filter the number of applicants who applied to Step 1 and aimed for the June 2021 cut-off. It must also be considered that many rejected companies might not have applied to Step 2 even if they were selected. Since there is no publically available data on this, the numbers given here are estimated.

Step 2

With the deadline having been on June 16th 2021 (it was delayed by 7 days from its original date), the number of applicants amounted to 801. It was later announced that 130 applicants were selected for the interviews, thereby yielding a 16% success rate for this Step.

Step 3

The EIC Accelerator pitch week occurred via remove video calls with the EIC Jury and was conducted in mid-September 2021. Out of the 130 candidates, 65 were able to convince the Jury and succeed in gaining the EIC Accelerator funding. This yielded a 50% success rate for this Step although 24 Swiss applicants were excluded from the process due to the political developments between the EU and the Swiss government.

Step 1-3 Total

With success rates of 67%, 16% and 50% for the respective Steps, the overall success rate for the June 2021 EIC Accelerator was an approximate 5.4% with 65 out of an estimated 1,196 applicants having been successful.

Additional Statistics

Budget

The original budget in the official EIC Accelerator Work Programme (read: The 2021 EIC Accelerator Work Programme) was set at €500M+ but, due to the lack of excellent cases, it was reduced in retrospect (i.e. only €360M+ were allocated to successful candidates). This is a very interesting development since the 2020 applications tended to have far more suitable candidates while budgets were generally too low.

In fact, all 2020 projects with a score of over 13 out of 15 were technically eligible to receive funding, pending the Jury assessment, and the total budgets requested by said projects were, as an example, €1.8B in January 2020 or €2.7B in May 2020. If a Jury assessment were to be applied and only 50% of selected companies were approved, it would still yield budgets that far exceed the 2021 numbers.

It is clear that the EIC Accelerator has become more selective. But it has also become less selective in some ways.

It is more selective since it had an excess budget but deemed most companies to be unsuitable to receive this funding. It has become less selective since success rates have exceeded 5% while 2020 saw rates between 1% and 3%.

A reasonable conclusion to make is that the new barrier for the EIC Accelerator is not the chasing of decimal points (i.e. a 2020 score of 13.7 could be invited to the interviews while 13.6 is not) but the effort applied to preparing the proposal documents for each step. Since many companies have no interest in spending such an extreme effort for almost a year, the pool of serious applicants will be minimized. If this is a good process will remain to be seen but, clearly, the European Innovation Council is not afraid to innovate.

Note: As this was the first cut-off of the new EIC Accelerator, the success rates and budget allocation might differ greatly for the October deadline and those in 2022.

Gender

The EIC has managed to gain a 20% ratio for female entrepreneurs amongst all beneficiaries (i.e. female CEO’s) due to its strict gender equity goals.

Top 3 Countries

Clear winners during this 2021 Call in June were France (18% of the successful beneficiaries), Germany (17%) and the Netherlands (12%).

Type of Funding

92% of successful applicants received both grant and equity financing (blended finance) according to the EIC’s Twitter account but this data does not seem to fit the beneficiaries list. The more accurate and official list of all beneficiaries shows the following statistic:

  • 31/65 blended (48%)
  • 5/65 grant-only (8%)
  • 24/65 grant-first (37%)
  • 5/65 equity-only (8%)

Note: The given statistics of 92% of applicants receiving grant and equity financing would fit if either the 8% grant-only or the 8% equity-only was excluded from the total. Although, this does not seem to yield an accurate statement and is likely an error.

EIC Accelerator Success: STABL Energy GmbH

One of the 11 funded German projects is STABL Energy GmbH which has been among the 5% of selected applicants. During the 6 month process after Step 1 opened in April 2021, they were able to successfully pass all three Steps of the EIC Accelerator evaluation and succeed in securing blended financing under the EIC.

STABL is developing innovative power electronics for Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) and, with their modular approach, they are able to deliver unprecedented benefits to the industry such as higher energy efficiency, software control, unique data services and lifecycle extensions through second-life use cases.

Why STABL was the perfect fit for the EIC Accelerator

STABL is enabling a sustainable, versatile and future-proof energy storage ecosystem that serves all relevant industries such as utilities, renewables and electric transport. As such, it was able to be part of the Green Deal Strategic Challenge and was an ideal fit for the subsegment of Battery and Energy Storage which was amongst the preferred project types (read: EIC Accelerator Work Programme).

In addition, STABL is a startup with high-level partnerships, traction and an excellent management team. The EIC aims to fund ambitious companies such as STABL that have a strong vision and the capability to realise them as well as the ability to change the European technological landscape for the better.

Note: Segler Consulting has supported STABL Energy GmbH for the entire application process.


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!



by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles:

How to Prepare for an EIC Accelerator Pitch Interview (SME Instrument Phase 2) – Part 1

The pitch interviews for the EIC Accelerator blended financing (formerly SME Instrument Phase 2, grant and equity financing) have been introduced quite recently but they are expected to remain a pillar of the evaluation process moving forward (read: Pitch vs. Proposal). With the jury consisting of mostly Venture Capitalists (VC) and angel investors, the focus of the interview is very commercialisation-oriented meaning that each applicant must understand their go-to-market strategy in and out (read: Why Companies Fail).

The European Commission (EC) and European Innovation Council (EIC) do not give clear guidance on pitch preparation in their documentation or the official template which makes smart in-house practise a must. The following presents a shortlist of the steps to take before the interview and how a successful EIC Accelerator pitch interview could be facilitated. It is important to assess each pitch individually and that things that are omitted on this list might be relevant in specified cases (i.e. bringing a hardware prototype, preparing a video, etc.).

When working with a professional writer or consultant, it is ideal to use the opportunity to extensively practise the pitch with them in the days and weeks leading up to the interview. In the end, “Under pressure, you don’t rise to the occasion, you sink to the level of your training” (Archilochus, 680-645 BC). Since you already know the specific restrictions of the interview, you can now use this knowledge to perfectly prepare your impact ahead of time and make use of all the resources at your disposal.

1. Restrictions

  • Limited time: 10 min pitch & 30 min of questioning
  • Limited attention: Jury has to go through multiple interviews per day
  • Limited knowledge: The Jury does not need to know the project or proposal
  • Limited responsibility: The Jury will not invest their own money but only need to help the EU reject excess projects

2. How to Prepare for the Pitch

2.1 Learn from Past Pitches

One of the easiest ways of gaining insight into past pitch sessions is to look through the list of recently funded beneficiaries and contact the companies to inquire about their experience (read: EIC Accelerator Results). This can be very useful since the prospective pitch participant can pre-select companies based on their region or industry to gain very customized information and increase their own success chances. Many companies will happily provide a list of questions and tips to help their fellow startups or Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) out.

Another great method is to contact professional writers or consultancies specialised on the EIC Accelerator or VC-like pitch events. If a writer has not been hired prior, it can still be useful to have a few practise calls with consultants in order to assure that all the speakers have all the support they need. Common questions, reasons for rejections or issues can be prepared for so that the applicant is not caught off-guard during the pitch (read: Reasons for Rejections).

2.2 Practise

It seems very obvious to advise companies to practise their pitch thoroughly but it is still skipped too often. The reason for that is that practising the pitch itself is just one part of the preparations and it can fall to the sidelines if too many other things are prioritized. Reading the pitch, researching topics, creating handouts, discussing the pitch and all related activities are not actual pitch practise – they should only be supplementary.

Practising the pitch means to simulate a real-life scenario (i.e. having a live audience or a remote-call audience), to have a stopwatch ready and to present the pitch from start to finish including the 30 min of questioning from critical but unaffiliated listeners. Practising means to actually go through the pitch and gain feedback on the speaker’s performance.

2.3 Open Pitch Sessions

Over a 2 week period, a company’s management team can meet every second or third day and have one full practice call whereas they can use the remaining days to prepare supporting documents, research relevant topics and improve their scripts. This will also allow them to exchange the audience for every call and gain fresh and difficult questions for each run which will present a perfect preparation for a real-life scenario.

If a company is affiliated with VC’s, accelerators, startup networks or industry mentors then there will likely be seasoned experts available who would be interested in supporting a promising startup – this could even lead to new investment opportunities in the future. The same goes for companies that already have a substantial audience on social media sites such as Linkedin, Twitter or Facebook whereas the pitch, if not under confidentiality, can be presented to a live audience with an open questioning in the end.

This article continues in Part 2.


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!



by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles:

How to Create Pitch Videos for the EIC Accelerator (SME Instrument Phase 2)

The European Commission (EC) and the European Innovation Council (EIC) are planning major changes to the EIC Accelerator blended financing (formerly SME Instrument Phase 2, grant and equity financing) application process whereas the introduction of video pitches is expected (read: EIC 2021). These can present a new challenge for prospect EIC Accelerator beneficiaries since video production, marketing and content creation are not always part of small DeepTech startups or Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) who are heavily focusing on research and development (R&D) work.

Additionally, consultants and professional writers alike now have an additional layer of skills that are required of them. These extend to the areas of video production, editing and the planning of filming scenarios. This article presents a short guide on the types of videos that could be prepared for an EIC Accelerator video pitch but restrictions regarding the content might be imposed by the European Union (EU) and the EIC in 2021.

1. Explainer-Type Videos

Explainer-type videos are very popular and easy to produce since they require no on-screen presence and can be entirely prepared on a computer. Such a video tells a story with animations and a voice-over which can take the viewer on a journey that provides all the information needed to understand a certain project.

The essential steps in creating an explainer video are the clear planning of the videos outline, the writing of a script and the decision-making for the desired look. Producing such a video in-house can be a challenge for most startups but there are free tools available that can aid in such a preparation.

1.1 Tools needed for in-house production

1.2 Outsourcing

Both the animation and the voice-overs can easily be outsourced via sites such as Upwork and Freelancer while the writing of the script should be done by the management team of the startup to assure clear communication and high quality.

2. Interview-Type Videos

A very easy to produce, informative and useful type of video is a simple interview which can be ideal for founders that are not used to being filmed and have a low budget but are good communicators. The team can simply prepare questions in advance that cover the innovation, team and business model while recording a large quantity of footage that can later be edited into a perfectly concise explanation of the project.

For such videos, choosing a great location (i.e. a bright and large office space) and assuring that the set has a pleasant look (i.e. lighting, backdrop, symmetry and background) will be very easy to do and significantly increase the quality of the video production. For the final editing, it is useful to remove all of the interview-questions and only focus on the explanations so that the final result is a clean and clear presentation of the project.

2.1 Tools needed for in-house production

2.2 Outsourcing

Outsourcing can be pricy if a video production team is hired and needs to be on-site to perform their work. If the management team is confident in their communication and filming skills, they can prepare all of the footage themselves and only outsource the video editing and animations (i.e. for titles, intros and transitions) which can be done remotely and is much less costly.

3. Hardware Footage

Depending on the type of technology, it can be advisable to film footage of the production processes, factories and hardware to illustrate the function of the innovation. This is an essential part of a video if the product is very hardware-heavy and if the main Technology Readiness Level (TRL) milestones have strongly focused on hardware parts. Read: How the EIC Accelerator Funds Technology Readiness Levels

Similar to interviews, such videos can easily be produced by companies themselves since they only require a video camera and some editing skills. Since sound is usually not needed, a microphone would only be required when voiceovers are prepared.

3.1 Tools needed for in-house production

  • DSLR or Smartphone
  • Adobe Premiere Pro

3.2 Outsourcing

Just like an interview-type video, hardware filming can be outsourced to a professional production team or partially outsourced to save costs if only editing support is needed.

4. Pitch Voice-Over

This is likely one of the easiest ways to prepare a pitch video and is expected to be the default for most companies due to its simplicity. A management team can use their existing pitch deck to record a call-like pitch session where the presented visual material is focusing exclusively on the pitch deck while the management team is only displayed with a webcam.

This approach requires no specialised skills and a video could even be recorded directly in Zoom, Skype or similar video-call software. A pitch deck can be prepared through programs such as Adobe InDesign or Microsoft PowerPoint and be used as-is.

4.1 Tools needed for in-house production

  • Microphone
  • Microsoft PowerPoint or Adobe InDesign (read: Adobe InDesign)
  • Webcam
  • Adobe Premiere Pro or Video Call Software

4.2 Outsourcing

Outsourcing of such a video production is not advised since any financial investments would be better spent on animations, voice-overs or the editing of footage.

5. Third-Party Footage

Lastly, for the lucky companies that have already been featured extensively in news, TV, media or online outlets, the respective footage can be used to edit a short profile of the project and management team. The publically available material can be downloaded and re-edited in Premiere Pro to quickly prepare a professional video.

5.1 Tools needed for in-house production

  • Adobe Premiere Pro

5.2 Outsourcing

Outsourcing can be performed for the editing process whereas the footage can be sent to a freelancer and they will create a video based on pre-defined specifications (i.e. what footage to include and how to structure it).

6. Summary

The following general video-types can be produced by startups to create a short video on their project and business:

  • Explainer-Type: Animations that guide the viewer through the story and details of the project
  • Interview-Type: Interviews with the founders to give a general overview.
  • Hardware Footage: Hands-on visuals of the product, the manufacturing and related physical aspects of the technology
  • Pitch Deck Recording: A simple recording of an online pitch without expensive production
  • Existing Footage: An edited version of existing media footage already available to the respective company

A mix of different options is highly advisable whereas a mix of the interviews, hardware footage and/or animations can create a professional-looking and easy to digest introduction for a disruptive innovation and company.


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!



by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles:

Where can EIC Accelerator Results be found? (SME Instrument Phase 2)

The EIC Accelerator blended financing (formerly SME Instrument Phase 2, grant and equity financing) is an interesting opportunity for startups or Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) to gain government funding for innovation activities. When working with a consultancy or professional grant writer, the process is simplified significantly but, when applying on their own, many startups are not entirely clear where results and awards are published.

The European Commission (EC), the European Innovation Council (EIC) and the European Agency for SME’s (EASME) have a variety of outlets where the names of awarded companies are published or how funded SME’s are notified. The core sources for such information are:

1. Email form the Funding and Tenders Portal

The best way to identify if your startup or SME has received the EIC Accelerator grant funding is to await the results sent through the Funding and Tenders Portal. If an account has been created and the submission has been completed, feedback by the European Union (EU) will proceed via a dedicated email to inform the applicant of the invitation to the EIC Accelerator interview week (i.e. in Brussels or via an online video call).

The email includes instructions regarding the upload of a pitch video (i.e. the pitch deck cannot be reviewed but supplemented with a short video), the registration of the speakers as well as the general timing of the pitch week.

2. Notification Area on the Funding and Tenders Portal

In case no email has been received, the EIC Accelerator applicants should check the Funding and Tenders Portal (F&TP) periodically where notifications are highlighted as badge counts. If the EC has important updates or news to communicate with the applicant, they will be found there.

There are a variety of notification zones inside the portal where messages can be exchanged, namely the main notification area on the F&TP, the document upload and communication area under “My Organizations” as well as the messaging section under the “Follow Up” section for an approved grant project.

In general, it is very difficult to miss any communication by the EC if emails are checked regularly and the F&TP is visited. If in doubt, the EIC’s twitter account can be visited to gain information on the timing of future communications (read: Finding EIC Accelerator News).

3. List of Beneficiaries on the EIC Accelerator Call Page

Another excellent source to identify the results of the EIC Accelerator is the regularly updated list of beneficiaries which gives the company name, website, acronym, project title and type of funding received (grant or blended financing with equity). The list can be found here and contains all EIC Accelerator-funded companies (incl. the SME Instrument Phase 2 beneficiaries).

Going back to January 2018 and spanning all of 2019 and 2020, the list further details the country of origin and city of residence for the applying entities. The document download page of the EIC Accelerator also includes occasional flash updates which give additional information on the calls total budget, funding success rate and the number of applicants (i.e. this example).

4. The CORDIS Database

Projects that have been selected for funding and have signed the Grant Agreement Contracts (GAC) will be published on the Community Research and Development Information Service (CORDIS) database. Here, the timing (i.e. project start and end), budget (i.e. grant and/or equity), name of the coordinator and the participating entities are listed.

In addition, the CORDIS page of an EIC Accelerator project will also contain the beneficiaries address, program information and the abstract of the project with detailed project reporting updates (read: The EIC Accelerator Abstract).

5. Publication on Social Media & Reports

Lastly, some information on EIC-funded companies can be found on social media sites such as Twitter (i.e. @EUEIC), Facebook (i.e. EIC), YouTube (i.e. European Commission or EU Science & Innovation) and Linkedin. When searching for the hashtag #EICAccelerator, companies often provide information on attempted or successful grant applications for past and current deadlines.

The EC likewise publishes regular reports on the performance of the EIC Accelerator (or SME Instrument) such as the recent The Deep Tech Europe Report: key numbers from the EIC performance and the previously published Innovation Kitchen: EIC Accelerator pilot in numbers.

These reports contain valuable statistics and key figures on the EIC Accelerator’s performance, information on the types of projects funded and the overall changes in budget, proposal template, gender contributions and industries.

Conclusion

Results regarding the successful applications for the EIC Accelerator can be found via:

  1. Email form the Funding and Tenders Portal
  2. Notification Area on the Funding and Tenders Portal
  3. List of Beneficiaries on the EIC Accelerator Call Page
  4. The CORDIS Database
  5. Publication on Social Media & Reports


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!



by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles:

Assessing an EIC Accelerator Applicant for Innovation, Traction and the Team (SME Instrument) – Part 1

When developing a project for an EIC Accelerator grant or equity application (formerly SME Instrument Phase 2), it is often useful for professional writers and consultants to look at certain key areas in order to obtain a fast overview of the project’s quality.

There are many sub-criteria to be analyzed that help in gaining a thorough understanding of a project but, for a rapid screening, a few core areas are sufficient to focus on. While consultants could break such an assessment down in a variety of ways based on professional preferences, the following presents a useful method to qualify prospect EIC Accelerator grant applicants in order to estimate their success chances:

  1. Innovation – this article
  2. Traction – read: Part 2
  3. Team – read: Part 3

1. Innovation

The term innovation, in and of itself, is supposed to give an answer to the question “Is the product or service unique and new?”. The innovative nature of the project is a key aspect of the EIC Accelerator which, since it is managed by the European Innovation Council (EIC), has placed “Innovation” at the core of its mission statement.

The EIC does not merely fund great businesses or supports European companies just based on their location but is explicitly targeting market disrupting and market-creating companies with the goal of supporting future European unicorns, i.e. companies valued at €1 billion+.

In order to fully assess such a project, looking at the innovation has to always come first and precede the assessment of any other segment. As an example, useful subsegments to further elaborate on the innovative nature of a project can be:

1.1 The Origin of the Innovation

From experience, most innovative companies are directly coming from two main subsegments which are:

A – The technical side (i.e. a university spin-off, technical experience, etc.) which means that they are close to cutting-edge Research & Development which makes them uniquely positioned to exploit the opportunity or

B – The industry-side through close relationships to stakeholders and industry players who are directly suffering from the customer pain point and are openly seeking a solution.

These two subsegments are not perfectly separated but often exhibit a strong overlap. In general, all types of innovations will at least fall into one of these two sub-categories. The origin of the innovation will very often give the professional writer or consultant an idea of its quality and, if analyzed thoroughly, can make an EIC Accelerator grant award much more likely.

1.2 Relationships Between the Innovation and the Customer Pain Points

Understanding that not every innovation is actually worth any kind of revenue is an important first step in investigating an EIC Accelerator project. A product or service can be highly innovative but it might not be easier to use or lower in costs compared to market alternatives which begs the question, “Why would a customer want this innovation?”.

There are plenty of examples of things that are different but not needed and can be described as an unwanted innovation. In order to avoid this, the assessment of a startup or Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise (SME) should include the relationship between the customer pain points, the Unique Selling Points (USP) of the innovation and the key technological features of the product or service.

This relationship will immediately tell the consultant or professional writer if an innovation is suitable for the EIC Accelerator grant financing or not since the official EIC template heavily screens for innovative and profitable projects.

1.3 The Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Status of the Innovation

Just like the innovative nature of a project, the IPR status can be a useful way to identify its core aspects but, in the same fashion, IPR does not equate innovation from an investors perspective. Patents can be very broad and can be filed for minuscule inventive steps that might not properly protect the market introduction of a certain product.

Just because something has been patented does not mean that the innovation assessment will be high by default. The IPR should only be the tip of the iceberg after the proposal has already explained how the innovation directly addresses the customer needs and is substantially better than any other market alternatives.

IPR should also not be viewed as the ultimate innovation proof since some innovations are better protected through secrecy because a patent, in and of itself, could already give the competition too much information and jeopardize the startup’s success.

1.4 The Barrier for Competitors to Copy the Innovation

Lastly, one key part of assessing if an innovation is suitable for substantial investments under the EIC Accelerator is its protection from a technological side. Having an innovation that is easy to copy will always reduce the success chances of the resulting evaluation process since the core barriers for all potential me-too competitors has to be addressed convincingly.

When a company like Facebook launched a successful social network, many other companies were aiming to replicate this success and, in order to persevere, the original company must have had clear barriers in place to protect its position on the top.

Such barriers can be in the form of know-how, proprietary methods, IPR, a head start or commercial factors such as industry relationships, customer interest, exclusivity agreements, etc.

Summary

Assessing the innovation of a prospect EIC Accelerator applicant is key for professional writers and grant consultants in preparing a competitive proposal and increasing its success chances significantly. The main criteria to assess a project’s innovation and to ensure a positive evaluation are:

  • The origin of the innovation (technical- & industry-side)
  • Solving a customer pain point
  • Intellectual Property Rights (IPR)
  • Barriers to entry

Part 2 (Traction) and Part 3 (Team) of this article can be found under the provided links.


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!



by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles:

Should a Company Hire a Professional Consultant or Write an EIC Accelerator Grant Application Internally? (SME Instrument Phase 2)

The EIC Accelerator Grant financing (SME Instrument Phase 2) is an interesting opportunity for both early-stage startups and established Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SME) that aim to further develop an innovative product. Many prospect applicants ask themselves if they should write an application on their own or if they should hire a professional consultant or grant writer who could prepare a successful application for them.

Answering this question can be difficult since it does depend on the individual companies skill set as well as past success in securing financing in highly competitive evaluation processes. Since consultants are often not the best people to ask if they should be hired or not, here is a basic list of things to consider for companies to make an informed decision regarding grant writing services:

Project Quality

The first question to be answered is with respect to the quality of the project. While a broad spectrum of industries and projects are eligible for an application, the success chances can vary greatly based on certain criteria such as innovativeness, commercial traction, European impact and the quality of the team (read: Identifying a Broad Vision).

This quality aspect is often difficult to assess for companies (i.e. “My company is the best!”) so it is recommended to reach out to a variety of consultancies and get a free assessment regarding the project quality, especially in terms of its innovative character. This can be a useful first step in planning the EIC Accelerator application process.

The Skill of Writing Proposals

From experience, most companies have very little expertise in writing, editing and perfecting competitive grant proposals but such a skill is absolutely essential in being successful. Even the most unique and excellent unicorn-company cannot succeed in securing the EIC Accelerator grant without great proposal writing. Some companies are naturally well-positioned to apply on their own and reach high evaluation scores but this is quite rare.

If a company has the skills needed for such an application then they usually have a strong track record of obtaining research grants with extensive experience in writing business plans, crafting commercial strategies and having had exhaustive feedback from investors and related stakeholders. This part is difficult to self-assess since most companies believe that they have such expertise but very few are actually correct since the template of the EIC Accelerator is highly simplified and does not properly reflect what an application should contain (read: The Biggest Mistakes When Applying to the EIC Accelerator).

Time & Focus

The time and focus needed to prepare an application and to perform potential re-submissions, research the evaluation process and master the subsequent hurdles that lead up to participating in the evaluation interview (i.e. pitch event) and signing the grant agreement contract all need to be calculated into the decision of hiring a grant consultant. Most companies lack the freedom to focus on such tasks and diverting their attention away from their core business or research can be detrimental in many cases.

As a result, hiring a writer is a great option since it removes all of the time-consuming efforts and reduces the workload to the simple gathering of data and the provision of feedback on certain aspects of the project (read: The Financing Timeline for the EIC Accelerator).

Financial Considerations

Some early-stage SME’s or startups are not in a position to pay the fees that are charged by consultancies which can make financial factors a possible barrier in seeking grant writing support. What needs to be considered is the budget a company has available for the writing process and what the opportunity-cost would be if internal team members spend 30 to 60 days in preparing an application as well as the time spent on re-submissions and editions which can span over a year in total. Since this time could be used for product development activities, businesses should carefully assess the internal costs related to preparing an application.

External consultancies that are offering grant writing services can vary greatly in their business models and fee structures which is why it is recommended to identify a number of different options and to discuss the pricing with each of them before making a decision. This way, the ideal budget for a startup can be assessed and an informed decision can be made (read: Pre-Requisites for an EIC Accelerator Application).

Summary

The major components to be assessed when considering to hire a professional writer or consultant for the EIC Accelerator are:

  • Project Quality: Is the project suitable for the EIC Accelerator?
  • Internal Skill Level: Does the team have the skill level necessary to apply?
  • Time & Focus: Can the company divert their focus from their core business activities?
  • Finances: Is the company able to afford a consultancy or cannot afford to prepare it internally?


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!


by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles:

The Biggest Mistakes When Applying to the EIC Accelerator (SME Instrument Phase 2)

Every once in a while, a company is reaching out to us with a rejected EIC Accelerator grant (SME Instrument Phase 2) application which they have prepared themselves but were unsuccessful with. Very rarely, such self-prepared applications are professionally written and reach a high score (i.e. above 13 out of 15) whereas, in most cases, these applications are well below scores of 12 and even below 10 in some cases.

Some common themes can be noticed when reviewing such applications and this article presents a list of the most common reasons why self-prepared applications have low scores. Usually, a lack of product innovation, an unexperienced team or the company itself are not the biggest reason for the low rating but the quality of the grant writing.

Of course, the innovative nature of the applying Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise (SME) or startup is important as well but the eligibility requirements from the European Commission (EC) and European Innovation Council (EIC) are relatively broad and inclusive enough as to not discount most projects.

Reason #1: Viewing the template as a questionnaire

The official EIC Accelerator grant application template (see Deviations from the Template) should be followed only as a general guideline and be used to develop and structure an application that is comprehensive and unique to the applying company. It should not be viewed as a questionnaire which is simply answered with a few general text snippets in the hopes that the reader will read between the lines.

None of the text found in the original template, outside of the headlines, should appear in the written application (i.e. none of the posed questions should be placed inside the proposal). The same goes for footnotes, guidelines, tips, abbreviations and rules which can be entirely omitted from the final proposal. All of the content found in the template acts as a guide for the applicant and does not need to be reproduced for the evaluator.

In addition, the official EU template is (intentionally) scarcely formatted and lacks guidelines on figures, tables and photos which is why it should by no means be viewed as a style guide or guide book for an EIC Accelerator application.

Reason #2: Addressing sections too shallowly

Imagine having a conversation with someone who only answers with “yes” or “no”. Every person would immediately lose interest in this interaction since a conversation is supposed to flow with each spoken sentence leading to a multitude of other sentences. In the same way, the European Commissions’s evaluation and review experts expect applicants to elaborate on each point which is why the writer should focus on telling a complete and impressive story.

In the end, the EU is looking for high-risk and high-reward unicorns which makes excitement and passion, in written form, a must for every application.

If the template asks for the timing of the innovation, why not elaborate as to why the current point in time is perfect to invest? Why is the market timing perfect? Why not describe the timing of the customer needs or competitive differentiators?

The key to avoiding this mistake is to be comprehensive but not too wordy. To add useful and valuable content that directly addresses the posed question but also addresses the criteria found in the Evaluation Summary Report (ESR) which presents the grant proposal rating (see Using the Evaluation Summary Report).

Reason #3: Not viewing the proposal as a story

The proposal must be a very well written business plan but also tell an exciting story. As such, there might be a variety of sections that seem unrelated (i.e. the intellectual property and the key performance indicators) but they should all be connected in some way so that the proposal makes sense and is consistent (see Identifying a Broad Vision for an EIC Accelerator Project).

It is also necessary to have a wholesome approach to proposal writing in order to fill in the gaps between sections (i.e. transitions) so that each section naturally flows into the next one. The proposal template might omit certain aspects or only ask for them vaguely instead of directly requesting them, i.e. a comprehensive introduction which could give context to the innovation, information on the companies financial health or other items commonly found in a business plan.

The final grant proposal should stand on its own (i.e. not rely on the template to make sense) and answer all the questions of an investor or Venture Capitalist (VC) while also being an interesting read. A great story has a beginning, a middle and an end which should be considered for the entire application (i.e. the problem, the solution and the roadmap) so that it builds trust with the reader and does not appear too shallow.

Reason #4: Omitting important sections that were not in the template

The EIC Accelerator grant proposal template does not account for the vast individuality between projects and applying companies. Describing the commercial strategy for a Business-to-Business (B2B) versus a Business-to-Consumer (B2C) project will require a different set of assumptions while a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) subscription model will be different from one-off hardware sales.

The EU cannot account for each case individually which is why the template is very general. The grant writer has to account for this and understand that the template is vague by design so that each applicant proactively elaborates on the respective sections according to their specific case.

The level of detail put into an application and the degree to which sections are described will also immediately tell the evaluator how well a certain project is thought through which, in turn, will dramatically affect the proposal score.

Reason #5: Not taking enough time for the writing

Every applicant should at least leave 50 days to prepare a great application and under no circumstances rush the process. In very rare cases, a company can prepare a competitive and professional application in only a few weeks but this is usually reserved for a case in which extensive business plans have already been written beforehand (incl. prepared financial projections, development plans and budgeting).

One of the most common reasons why companies receive very low scores is that the application was prepared in a rush (i.e. in under a week) without properly reading the Work Programme and template as well as treating the application as a low-effort lottery ticket and not as a well-crafted financing proposal.

Reason #6: Not understanding the evaluation criteria

The evaluators will grade the proposal based on a certain checklist of criteria and not only rate them based on their overall impression (i.e. the ESR criteria – see here). All of these individual points (i.e. criteria) will need to become an integral part of the written application even if some are entirely absent from the template itself.

It is useful to first read the evaluation criteria and then to read the EIC Accelerator template since both documents are an important part of a successful grant application. This attention to detail alone will already place the applicant ahead of the competition since most companies are not aware of the difference between the template and the evaluation scoring.

It is common, especially for first-time applicants, to not understand how proposals are graded and to mistakenly view the official template as the only guiding document.

Reason #7: Not being persistent enough

It could be that the proposal, while having been rejected, is not a lost cause by default but only needs more time. Maybe the initial score was above 13 (out of the maximum 15) and the application simply needs a few useful additions in order to reach the threshold for the interview invitation (i.e. EIC Accelerator pitch week in Brussels).

If so, there is currently no limitation as to how many times an application can be submitted which allows each applicant to edit and improve the proposal for a re-submission with improved results.

The success rates for the highly competitive EIC Accelerator can oscillate between 1% and 7%, depending on the specific deadline and occasional pandemic, while the scores for unchanged resubmissions can vary as well, depending on the randomly chosen reviewers.

From experience, it usually takes multiple attempts in order to receive the grant financing which is why no company should give up too early.

Reason #8: No effort is made for the annexes

While Document 1 is unquestionably the most important part of the EIC Accelerator application, attention should also be placed on the annexes, namely the pitch deck, the financial documentation and the general annexes (see Software Choices for the Annexes). While these might receive less attention during the evaluation process, they will greatly influence the overall impression of the application and, in addition, the pitch deck cannot be changed once step 1 is achieved.

Making the annexes look professional and well-designed takes little effort compared to writing Document 1 and it should not be neglected in order to maximize the applications success chances.

Summary

The biggest reasons as to why self-prepared applications receive low scores are:

  1. Viewing the template as a questionnaire: The template is only a guide and should not appear in the proposal
  2. Addressing sections too shallowly: Every section must show a high level  of  depth
  3. Not viewing the proposal as a story: Good writing over cryptic brevity
  4. Omitting important sections that were not in the template: Customizing the proposal to the unique project
  5. Not taking enough time for the writing: Attention to detail takes time – at least 50 days
  6. Not understanding the evaluation criteria: Reading what the scoring will be based on – the ESR (see here)
  7. Not being persistent enough: Re-submissions are key
  8. No effort is made for the annexes: Making every proposal document as perfect as possible (see here)


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!


by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles:

Finding Updates and News for the EIC Accelerator (SME Instrument Phase 2)

The European Commission has a variety of channels where updates and news are published. For the EIC Accelerator (SME Instrument Phase 2), there is not a single, centralized source of information but a variety of fragmented channels which should be scanned periodically in order to remain up-to-date on recent developments.

This is essential in preparing a successful grant (or blended finance) application since proposal template updates are usually unannounced and implementing them can be critical for success.

It is also important to always remain in the loop regarding the European Innovation Councils (EIC) newest strategies since they can make the difference between an immediate rejection (i.e. non-environmental applications during the Green Deal cut-off) and receiving a fair proposal evaluation.

Startups, as well as Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME), should be particularly careful to do not miss any details since, for example, the United Kingdom (UK) is now only allowed to apply for grant financing under the EIC Accelerator but not for equity (i.e. blended finance) for the deadline on October 7th 2020 due to Brexit. After Horizon 2020, the UK’s future is likewise uncertain as it relates to Horizon Europe in 2021-2027.

In the past, changes have also been made to the number of applicants whereas consortia were allowed pre-2019 but the current EIC Accelerator is exclusively a single-applicant program.

The following is a short collection of the most important websites and pages which are used to publicise relevant EIC Accelerator (SME Instrument Phase 2) updates. These are not only important for consultants and professional writers but also for applicants who are currently resubmitting a proposal and want to verify if templates or guidelines have changed since the last submission.

Note: The list is focussing on updates rather than informative material so manuals and general guidelines are excluded.

1. Twitter

The EIC twitter account (@EUeic) is one of the most useful resources for receiving the newest EIC Accelerator updates. Information regarding interview invitations, delays and other general changes is often published on Twitter first. It is always worth studying the account’s timeline and replies when considering to apply for the grant financing since essential updates will likely be found there (i.e. EIC Accelerator Interviewees from March Deadline Unable to Apply for May Cut-Off)

2. EIC Accelerator Call Page

The official call page for the EIC Accelerator is likewise rich in content, ranging from the current application deadlines, over documentation on the grant status to an update feed which often details the number of submissions received and sometimes includes flash reports which contain statistics on the actual call budget, above-threshold proposals and other relevant information.

The collection of documents also contains, amongst other things, a complete list of the financed companies and brief information on their respective projects. Updates are infrequent and inconsistent but valuable in most cases.

3. Google

One of the most important aspects of staying up to date with the EIC Accelerator is the official documentation for the Work Programme and the Proposal Template. Both documents are usually quietly uploaded by the EU and replace the old documents automatically which means that a writer or consultant has to periodically check if the files have changed.

The easiest way to do this is, for example, to search for EIC Accelerator template PDF on Google and to check the PDF for its current version which is given at the beginning of the document (i.e. the last update as indicated in the history table). The details of the performed changes are usually conveniently listed as well which makes studying the new template easier (i.e. view EIC Accelerator: New Proposal Template from March 20th).

The same is true for the Work Programme which is just as important as the proposal template and can be searched and investigated in the same way.

4. European Innovation Council (EIC) Newsletter

The EIC has recently created a newsletter which is designed to keep all interested parties up to date. While it might grow in the future, so far, the content has been infrequent and less informative than other outlets due to simple re-posting of existing content.

5. Newsroom: EASME and SME Instrument News

The search pages on the EU’s Newsroom can be very useful in filtering for relevant information related to topics of interest. The Executive Agency for Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises (EASME) and European Innovation Council (EIC) are great choices to search for since they often publish EIC Accelerator- related content. Other options are keywords such as Innovation or other similar terms.

6. Related Websites or Institutions

Alternative resources for EIC Accelerator-related content are informative websites by consultancies specialised on the grant or initiatives such as Access4SMEs and Access2EIC. Social media can also be a useful way to identify quality information sources (i.e. #eicaccelerator on Twitter) and can be beneficial for both prospect- and awarded-companies.


These tips are not only useful for European startups, professional writers, consultants and Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SME) but are generally recommended when writing a business plan or investor documents.

Deadlines: Post-Horizon 2020, the EIC Accelerator accepts Step 1 submissions now while the deadlines for the full applications (Step 2) will be on March 16th 2022, June 1st 2022 and October 5th 2022 under Horizon Europe. The Step 1 applications must be submitted weeks in advance of Step 2. The next EIC Accelerator cut-off for Step 2 (full proposal) can be found here. After Brexit, UK companies can still apply to the EIC Accelerator under Horizon Europe albeit with non-dilutive grant applications only - thereby excluding equity-financing.

Contact: You can reach out to us via this contact form to work with a professional consultant.

EU, UK & US Startups: Alternative financing options for EU, UK and US innovation startups are the EIC Pathfinder (combining Future and Emerging Technologies - FET Open & FET Proactive) with €4M per project, Thematic Priorities, European Innovation Partnerships (EIP), Innovate UK with £3M (for UK-companies only) as well as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grants with $1M (for US-companies only).

Any more questions? View the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

Want to see all articles? They can be found here.

For Updates: Join this Newsletter!


by Stephan Segler, PhD
Professional Grant Consultant at Segler Consulting

General information on the EIC Accelerator template, professional grant writing and how to prepare a successful application can be found in the following articles: